Bacon Walnut Snow Pea Salad

Salade de Pois Gourmands aux Lardons et aux Noix

Veggie lover that I am, our new year’s eve party buffet had to include something green. Maxence and I love snow peas, because of the taste and the crunch and the look, but they’re seldom served in France, so I’m always happy to give them the space in the sun that they rightfully deserve. I think they’re perfect in salads, and this is what struck my fancy this time : a scrumptious combination that went surprisingly well with the terrine.

Terrine and salad were then followed by Stéphan’s sumptuous lamb tagine, complete with prunes, dates, apricots, almonds and walnuts, served in the beautiful tagine dish that Maxence’s mom brought us back from Turkey.

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Goatfish Terrine

Terrine de Rougets

[Goatfish Terrine]

Every once in a while I get cooking cravings – the sudden desire to tackle a new sort of dish or technique. About six months ago, I decided I really needed to try and make terrines. I promptly bought myself a little recipe book, simply called “Terrines“, by Catherine Quévremont. It contains thirty easy and tempting recipes of meat, fish or vegetable terrines, and even a couple of dessert terrines.

I then embarked upon the difficult quest for the perfect terrine dish. I wanted a rectangular one, so the slices would all be of equal shape and size, with a lid. I thought this a simple need, but apparently, it was not. I combed every kitchen store in the city and found an impressive array of terrine dishes in all shapes and sizes : oval with a lid, yes. Rectangular with no lid, no problem. But rectangular with a lid? Not a single solitary one. Thankfully, I went to spend a few days with my parents in the Vosges (a mountain range in the East of France), and a visit to the incredibly resourceful Catena store (simple concept : they have everything) ended the search by way of a beautiful bright red ceramic terrine dish with a lid. I was so happy I threw in silicon molds to make financiers and a cool zester, too.

My terrine-making urge first produced a meat terrine for a picnic at the Buttes-Chaumont (terrine d’agneau aux fruits secs et aux épices — a spiced lamb terrine with dried fruits), then a vegetable terrine for a luncheon with Maxence’s mom and grandparents (ratatouille en terrine — a layered terrine with zucchini, eggplant, tomato, arugula and tapenade). Although somewhat time consuming, especially the veggie one, they were both fun to make and I was very happy with the way they looked and tasted.

The food at our new year’s eve party was going to be served buffet-style, and I thought a terrine would be a good idea. I wanted to make a fish one this time, and my book had a recipe for a goatfish terrine that looked really good, so this is what I set about to do, making a few modifications here and there. The recipe relied on the potatoes only to hold the terrine together, but I found that this made the final product a bit messy to serve, as the slices sort of collapsed. So the recipe below is the one I would use next time, using gelatin to help the terrine hold its own.

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Pasta Shells Stuffed with Ricotta and Tapenade

Coquillages Farcis Ricotta et Tapenade

[Pasta Shells Stuffed with Ricotta and Tapenade]

Last Tuesday, my sister Céline and I met for lunch. The plan was to eat at Rose Bakery, but it was closed for the holidays, so we went down the rue des Martyrs to Fuxia instead, a really nice Italian restaurant, hip yet friendly, where we had truly excellent salads. After that, we spent the afternoon strolling around the neighborhood, enjoying the unexpectedly sunny weather, and running various errands, which culminated in the buying of great fabric and crafts material at the Marché St Pierre, a huge discount fabric store at the foot of the Sacré-Coeur.

At one point, we went into a little store that the Fuxia people just opened, an Italian fine goods store and trattoria called Fuxia l’Epicerie. It’s open everyday till 10 pm, and sells a variety of Italian goodies (pasta, biscotti, condiments and the like) as well as freshly made antipasti and main dishes to go, which you can also eat at the small counter – comptoir de dégustation. Nice.

From one of the shelves, I distinctly heard a pack of conchiglie, big shell-shaped pasta, calling my name with their many little voices. Hmm, thought I. Stuffed shell pasta! Great finger food for the new year party! Back home, I took out a cookbook in which I remembered seeing something like this, but the recipes, though nice, didn’t appeal to me very much at the time (chicken-tomato, salmon-dill and ham-béchamel), so I made up my own.

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…et Bonne Année!

Fringe Benefits

I wish you all the very best for 2004 : health, happiness, love, friendship, prosperity and above all, excellent chocolate.

We hosted a little “réveillon” party yesterday night, for which Stéphane and I cooked up a pocket-sized storm. Recipes and stories are on the way!

And to mark the new year, I have had my hair cut with a fringe! It wasn’t planned at all, it just sort of happened. I looked at the girl getting her hair cut before me, she was pretty, she had a fringe (hers was long, below the brows), the thought popped into my head, it sounded nice, and I asked my (very friendly) hairdresser Michaël : “tiens, et une frange, ce serait une bonne idée?“. He said yes, he said cute, he said short, I said go!

La Nouvelle Ere
(Hairdresser)
4 rue des Abbesses
75018 Paris
01 42 57 40 55

Meine Wunderschöne Gebäck-Presse

Meine Wunderschöne Gebäck-Presse

Please meet my new beautiful friend, the cookie press! Personally imported from Germany by my sister, and an awesome Christmas present for the kitchen toy addict that I am. You should have heard me squealing with joy, kneeling at the foot of the tree!

It comes complete with a full set of cute little cookie shapes and an instructions booklet – hilarious in its French translation – that includes recipes. There is even a special attachment to fill Berliners, those little jelly donuts JFK identified himself so well with! What more could I want?

The process is this : you roll the cookie dough into a log, put the log inside the cylinder, pick the shape you like best, and start cranking away above an ungreased cookie sheet, dropping little blobs of dough that will bake into the chosen shape. You can even use two colors of dough for beautiful effects.

Needless to say, this will be put to good use soon, very soon. Stay tuned!

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