My 6 Favorite Croissants in Paris

I am very, very passionate about croissants; I think it’s about as close to perfection as a single baked good can get.

I love the contrast of textures between the crunchy tips, the thinly crisp outer shell, and the moist, tender insides. I love how the combined flavors of butter and flour are fundamentally enhanced by a properly conducted fermentation. I love a warm croissant fresh out of the oven, but I love one that’s been sitting for an hour or two even more. And in truth, I like a day-old, chewy croissant as well. (Unless I decide to turn it into an almond croissant.)

I find that the croissant is an excellent product to judge a baker by, as there is truly nowhere to hide: a croissant reveals the quality of your ingredients and your skill level in the most transparent manner. It is such a simple preparation in theory, yet one that is radically shaped by the hand that makes it.

I recently contributed an article about the best croissants in Paris to the spring 2016 issue of Bake from Scratch, an American magazine devoted to (you guessed it) baking. This particular issue is all about France, and my piece involved research and interviews, a lot of cycling around the city, and a lot of tasting.

I boiled it all down to (my personal selection of) the best croissants in Paris, which I’m delighted to share with you today. As you’ll see in the pictures below, each of these croissants has a distinctive personality, but all can be trusted to deliver the most delicious whoosh of flaky butteriness in an irresistibly golden, brittle package.

If you’re ever in Paris, here’s where I recommend you get your croissant fix:

French Food Cheat Sheet

Des Gâteaux et du Pain

Claire Damon’s is one of the few pastry shops in France run by a female chef; her picture-perfect croissant is the one heading this post! Stark black décor — don’t be intimidated! — and top-notch range of pâtisseries, viennoiseries, and breads.

Des Gâteaux et du Pain

Des Gâteaux et du Pain
63 bd Pasteur, 75015 Paris
M° Pasteur
Closed Tuesdays

Du Pain et des Idées

Du Pain et des Idées

Christophe Vasseur offers a short range of superbly crafted goods. In addition to his rather unconventional croissant — see how it’s shaped almost like a knot? — you should try the signature Pain des Amis, a slow-fermented loaf with a smoky flavor, and his escargots (snail-shaped pastries).

Du Pain et des Idées

Du Pain et des Idées
34 rue Yves Toudic, 75010 Paris
M° Jacques Bonsergent
Closed Saturday and Sunday

Gontran Cherrier

Gontran Cherrier

Gontran Cherrier is France’s favorite celebrity baker; he hosts a television show that has him hunting for the best boulangeries in France. More than that, though, he is an excellent artisan and I love his selection of viennoiseries and specialty breads, including this rye and red miso loaf.

Gontran Cherrier

Gontran Cherrier
22 rue Caulaincourt, 75018 Paris
M° Blanche
Closed Wednesdays

Liberté

Liberté

Benoît Castel’s bakery and pastry shop is a modern and attractive space with an open area where you can see the pastry team at work. The Ménilmontant location does a very popular brunch on the weekend.

Liberté

Liberté
39 rue des Vinaigriers, 75010 Paris
M° Jacques Bonsergent

Dominique Saibron

Dominique Saibron

Saibron’s bakery, facing the bustling Place d’Alésia, has a roomy café area where you can sample your purchases. A good breakfast destination!

Dominique Saibron

Dominique Saibron
77 avenue du Général Leclerc, 75014 Paris
M° Alesia
Closed Mondays

Maison Landemaine

Maison Landemaine

Rodolphe Landemaine is a talented young baker with a dozen bakeries to his name. The croissants are prepared in a central lab, then baked fresh in each bakery, so you’ll get the same quality regardless of the shop you visit.

Maison Landemaine

Maison Landemaine
26 rue des Martyrs, 75009 Paris
M° Notre-Dame-de-Lorette
Closed Mondays

Join the conversation!

Do you have your own opinion on who makes the best croissant in Paris? And are you able to get quality croissants where you live?

Further reading: If you read French, check out Raids Pâtisserie’s croissant post, and Le Figaro’s selection as well (subscription required).

Note: Most of the bakeries listed have multiple locations; find them all on my Paris favorites map!

  • Phillip Lamb

    No Ble Sucré ?

  • Taste of France

    These all look yummy. The one thing I find unforgivable regarding croissants is sticky glaze on top.

    • Ugh, that’s the worst! A simple sugar syrup to add shine is standard, but sticky? No!

      • Taste of France

        Not even for shine. Just butter, all the way.
        There’s a boulangerie near me that has croissants au beurre. I thought croissants were with butter by definition.

        • “Croissants au beurre” as opposed to “Croissants ordinaires” made with (gasp!) margarine. These are becoming extinct, but they were a cheaper alternative favored (presumably) back when people still believed hydrogenated fats were better for you than butter. o_O

          • Taste of France

            THANK YOU for the education! Now I can steer clear! Of course, I would only get croissants au beurre, anyway, but now I know!

  • Madonna Ganier-Yancey

    I’m making note of these places for our next trip, hopefully in October. The hotel we call our home away from home is near the Luxembourg Gardens. I hope one of these shops is in our neighborhood. I love a good croissant.
    By the way, I enjoyed your article in Bake from Scratch. I was thumbing through the issue before carefully reading it and remarked to my husband that the woman in the photos accompanying the article on croissants looked a lot like Clotilde, who writes the Chocolate & Zucchini blog. Then I realized it was you.

    • Thank you Madonna! Those photos do look eerily like myself. :)

    • Gibson

      Actually this is similar to what I wanted to post. While they look delicious, these establishments are a bit out of the way, except for the 15th. I would like to see more suggestion a bit more central. DO you avoid areas such as the 7th, 6th, etc. because they are more touristy? I also notice this when recommending restaurants.

      • “Out of the way” is a relative concept, it depends on where you live/stay. ;) Are you currently in Paris, or planning a trip there?

        I chose the bakeries based on the quality of their croissants, so I wasn’t trying to give options to cover the entire city, though every arrondissement has great options.

        In general, my recommendations do lean toward the Right Bank because that’s the bank where I live, but also where a majority of the exciting food stuff happens.

  • Joanne

    59 RdS bakery at 59 rue de Saintonge,
    75003 – Benjamin Turquier makes awesome croissants, baguettes, chouquettes (my personal favourite).

  • judi

    Yes! Amazingly the village bakery in 24190 St Vincent de Connezac (in Dordogne) makes really excellent croissants. Just as well, as we don’t really have any choice!

    • Such a beautiful region, I’m glad you’re *also* able to indulge in quality croissants there. ^^

  • Velia

    So sorry that I’ve never been to france, so I cannot comment. But if I were there I would be a regular customer to all those you posted. I love croissants and all breads.

    • Have you ever tried making your own?

      • Velia

        No I haven’t, I buy them. However, I do know they are not mad with butter, but then we do not have good bakeries around here. That is why I bake most of my bread and other goodies. No cookies, do not care for these.

        • I made my own once, just for the fun of it. And it was fun! But not as good as what I can get literally around the corner. :D

          • Velia

            Too time consuming, and certainly I am NOT going to be sharing them if they turn out fabulous, then I’ll have a problem. ha ha

          • I know what you mean. ^^ They do freeze really well (before baking), so that’s a good portion-control tool if necessary.

          • Velia

            I found “Kouri Aman” recipe on Tasting Table site, The photo is so tempting I copied the recipe without photo, Maybe this Summer, I’ll make them. Found another spelling Koiugn Amann, have no idea which is correct.

          • Hm. I’ve never heard or seen the term kouri aman, but I’m very familiar with kouign amann! It’s a delight.

          • Velia

            Two different sites had different spellings. This is not a French name is it? Sounds Arabic to me

  • Barry Leiba

    Thanks for that; I’ll be in Paris in a few months and will make a point of trying at least a couple of these.

    I’d hardly recommend most croissants in the U.S., but here: if you find yourself in Salt Lake City, you must check out Passion Flour Patisserie: http://www.passionflourslc.com/
    All their pastries are vegan, and yet their croissants (regular, chocolate, almond, and when I was there in the fall, pumpkin) are the best I’ve ever had (including in Paris). Perfectly crisp, perfectly flakey, perfectly tender inside, and very tasty.

    • Hm, I wonder what fat they use in their croissants if they’re vegan! I’m weary of margarine, even the organic “natural” ones. Do you know what they use?

      • Barry Leiba

        No, I don’t know. I know people who swear by Crisco for pie crusts. I’ll be in SLC in mid-May and will try to stop there. Assuming I do, I’ll ask them and report back.

        • Thanks Barry, it will be interesting to hear back!

          • Barry Leiba

            OK, just back from SLC, and the croissants at Passion Flour are still great…
            But they won’t share any information about how they make them. Sigh.
            Apparently, the place is notoriously tight-lipped about their recipes and techniques. Which, frankly, makes me a bit less inclined to recommend them to people.

          • Ah well. It’s a very competitive market, so I’m not surprised they keep their secrets.

  • evainthekitchen

    Great list! I love a good croissant, especially when I can persuade others to go get them on Sunday morning. My personal favourite is Le Grenier a Pain, conveniently located just near our apartement ;-)

    • Which location of the Grenier à Pain would that be? I’m near the one that was picked TWICE as best baguette in Paris. ^^

      • evainthekitchen

        The one very far from where you are (I think), in Vanves!

  • These all looking so yummy. I like it.. I have also some thing new hope you all like it http://shubucyber.in/

  • rachelsloan79

    This is perfect timing – I’ll be in Paris next week and it turns out I’m staying walking distance from one of the Landemain shops! I’ll make it my mission to try it for myself… currently the only place on your list that I’ve been to is Saibron, and I completely agree, they’re wonderful.

    I am happy to report that, as was not so much the case when I first lived in London 16 (!) years ago, good croissants are increasingly easy to find here. :)

    • Do report back on the Landemaine croissant ! What’s your favorite place to get them in London?

      • rachelsloan79

        I really like the ones from Fabrique (which funnily enough is Swedish!). And Paul Rhodes does a spelt croissant which is lovely if totally untraditional.

  • emmmgo

    When you were in the US did you ever try the croissants at Tartine in SF? If so, how do they compare?

    • I never did try them, no. Tartine didn’t exist when I lived in California, and now when I get a chance to visit I’m more inclined to try American things. ^^

  • Anna Kletyonkina

    these are so perfect!! I’m on my baking way to bake the same thing at home…
    thanks for the post, next time in Paris I’ll know where to check new tastes)

  • Nice list! I like very much the one of Maison Pichard (very light), Terroirs d’avenir (dense), Boulangerie Bo. And in London, gails bakery, Albion, The Flour Station

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